Good or evil?

Jesus went into a synagogue and noticed a man there who had a deformed hand. Since it was the Sabbath, Jesus’ enemies watched him closely. If he healed the man’s hand, they planned to accuse him of working on the Sabbath.

Jesus said to the man with the deformed hand, “Come and stand in front of everyone.” Then he turned to his critics and asked, “Does the law permit us to do good things on the Sabbath, or is it a day for doing evil? Is this a day to save life or to destroy it?” But they refused to answer him.

He looked around at them in anger, deeply saddened by their hard hearts, then he said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” So the man stretched out his hand, and it was completely restored. Immediately the Pharisees went away and began to consult with the supporters of Herod how they could kill Jesus.

Jesus went out to the lake with his disciples, and a large crowd followed him. They came from all over Galilee, Judea, Jerusalem, Idumea, from east of the Jordan River, and even from as far north as Tyre and Sidon. The news about his miracles had spread far and wide, and vast numbers of people came to see him. Jesus instructed his disciples to have a boat standing by so the crowd would not crush him. He had healed many people that day, so all the sick people eagerly pushed forward to touch him. And whenever those possessed by evil spirits caught sight of him, the spirits would throw them to the ground in front of him shrieking, “You are the Son of God!” But Jesus sternly commanded the spirits not to tell anyone else who he was.

Afterwards, Jesus went up on a mountainside and sent for the people he wanted, and they came to him. Then he appointed twelve men who would accompany him, preach and have authority to drive out demons. These are the twelve that he chose: Simon (whom he called Peter), James and John, the sons of Zebedee (whom Jesus called Boanerges, meaning “sons of thunder”), Andrew, Philip, Bartholomew, Matthew, Thomas, James (son of Alphaeus), Thaddaeus, Simon (the Zealot), and Judas Iscariot (who later betrayed him).

Mark

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